ABSTRACT

The opening of a new and perilous decade, public attention focused on more than corruption in the criminal judiciary fascinating as that was. The summer it was reported that the Kings County Grand Jury had issued a warning that racketeering was increasing in scope and power. That report was followed on August 28, with a statement from Brooklyn District Attorney George E. Brower that racketeers were working in the ice, laundry, window-cleaning, and milk trades. The sociology seems to have functioned in much the same manner as the geography: moving from position to position in a vertical ascent toward the Mayor. The Samuel Seabury investigations are like a prism refracting light on both general and specific concerns. The earliest achievements were naturally inextricably bound with Seabury’s victories in his three investigations and were mainly of the “throw the rascals out” variety.